Islamic Terrorism in India

Most Muslims are not terrorists, but most terrorists are Muslims

Kerala IGP’s Islamic Terror Links

Posted by jagoindia on September 30, 2011


NIA Nails Kerala IGP’s Terror Links
By Jeemon Jacob
Dated 10 Sep 2011

THE NATIONAL Investigation Agency (NIA) has established that Kerala Inspector General of Police (IGP) Tomin J Thachankary hobnobbed with several persons linked to terror outfits during a visit to Doha in March 2010. The 1987 batch IPS officer has always been in the news. A report in TEHELKA (NIA probes point to Kerala as new hub of terror funds by Shahina KK, 17 July 2010) had shown the state to have a disproportionate share of six out of 14 cases being looked into by the apex agency, the most sensitive being that of ‘an IPS officer’.

via link

Posted in Gulf, Indian Muslims, Islamofascism, Kerala, State, Terrorism | Comments Off on Kerala IGP’s Islamic Terror Links

What have you done for Pandits: SC asks J & K

Posted by jagoindia on September 23, 2011


The journey back home

Minhaz Merchant Aug 21, 2011

A three-judge Supreme Court bench, headed by chief justice Sarosh Kapadia, is hearing a petition against the Jammu & Kashmir government on the plight of Kashmiri Pandits forced to flee the Valley. The apex court is focussing on two issues: one, jobs promised to the Pandits by the J&K government; two, rebuilding their vandalised homes. Visibly annoyed with the senior counsel representing the J&K government, the Supreme Court bench observed acidly: “We didn’t want to go by your dream proposals, but want firm action. Can you show us even one instance where you have set aside the sale (of a Pandit home) and given it back to the victim?”

With the Supreme Court likely to pass a seminal order on their rehabilitation and return to the Valley, Kashmir’s Pandits have new hope that they will receive justice after 22 years of the most devastating ethnic cleansing in post-Independence India. Under legal pressure, a special employment package announced by the prime minister has already led to a trickle of Pandits flowing back into the Valley. In a significant if symbolic move, the US House of Representatives recently introduced a resolution highlighting the plight of the dispossessed Pandits.

What have you done for Pandits: SC asks J&K

Jan 18, 2011

NEW DELHI: The Supreme Court has expressed displeasure over inertia of the Jammu and Kashmir government to implement rehabilitation packages for Kashmiri Pandits who fled the Valley in the aftermath of insurgency. It asked the state to take firm action to ameliorate their condition.

“Tell us what have you (state government) done with your promise of providing 15,000 jobs? Have you given a single job? Or, for that matter, have you given them a single house,” asked a three-judge bench headed by Chief Justice SH Kapadia on Monday. We don’t want to go by your dream proposals, but want some firm action”.

It was hearing a petition filed by the All India Kashmiri Samaj and others alleging neither the state government nor the Centre was addressing grievances of Kashmiri Pandits who have been suffering for over two decades.

The court asked the state government to furnish data on steps taken to ameliorate the plight of Pandits. It asked the state to explain whether the government had set aside even a single sale of house as illegal since hundreds of houses between 1990-1997 belonging to Pandits had been auctioned and sold illegally after the victims fled the Valley.

“Can you show us even one instance where you have set aside the sale and given it back to the victim.” The bench granted four weeks to the state government to explain it.

Earlier, the court had sought a response from the state government on Rs 1,618-crore special package offered by Centre for restoring properties and providing jobs to migrant Pandits. It also expressed reservations over the Centre’s scheme saying it was not clear as to how the migrants on return will stay without any accommodation.

“Where will people who want to go back stay? Now, their properties have been sold or auctioned. There are number of petitions pending in the High Court. How will they go? Without house, how can people go back to Jammu and Kashmir,” the bench asked.

Additional Solicitor-General Indira Jaising on behalf of the Centre, however, assured the court that properties auctioned between 1990 to 1997 would be declared “illegal” and would be “restored” to owners. “All those auctions are illegal and they will be cancelled,” she had said. According to the Centre, Rs 12.5 crore has already been allocated to the state government for providing transit housing to the migrants.

An estimated 4.5 lakh Kashmiri Pandits had migrated from the Valley over 20 years back, fearful of the insurgency in the state.

Posted in Appeasement, Hindus, Islamofascism, Kashmir, Kashmir Pandits, Minorities, State, Terrorism | Comments Off on What have you done for Pandits: SC asks J & K

Kozhikode Twins Blasts: Two Islamic Terrorists Found Guilty, Sentenced For Life

Posted by jagoindia on September 19, 2011


Kozhikode Blast: T Naseer, Aide Sentenced For Life
PTI | Kochi | Aug 12, 2011

In the first judicial verdict in an NIA investigated case, a court today sentenced suspected LeT militant T Naseer and another accused to life imprisonment on charges including sedition in the 2006 Kozhikode blast case.

The quantum of punishment was pronounced by the National Investigating Agency court judge S Vijay Kumar, a day after Naseer and Shafas were found guilty.Two others were acquitted.

Naseer was handed down three life terms and Shafas two life sentences under Section 18 and Sect 16(1) of the Unlawful Activities (prevention act) and Sect 4(b) of the Explosives Substances Act.

The court also imposed a fine of Rs 1.60 lakh on Naseer and Rs 1.10 lakh on Shafas. Both were awarded two years imprisonment each under Sect 124(A) of IPC (sedition) and two years each under Sect 153 (wantonly giving provocation with intent to cause riot).

The sentences would run concurrently, the court held.

Two policemen and a porter were injured in the Kozhikode blasts.

The judge ordered the accused to do physical labour and that they be given vocational training and permitted to have reading material in vernacular language relating to patriotic persons.

NIA counsel said this was a grave crime and no leniency should be shown to the accused. As far as India was concerned, the twin blasts in a city was a very serious crime.

Citing Supreme Court rulings, he said the impact of offence was on the whole society. Peace of the society had been disturbed by exploding bombs. It creates fear in society and so no leniency should be shown.

NIA Chief Investigating officer of the case and NIA SP, T K Rajmohan, told PTI that after formation of NIA in 2009, this was its first case in the country in which a judgement was delivered.

NIA is probing 22 cases across the country, of which seven related to Kerala, the official in charge of NIA cases in Kerala, Karnataka and Lakshadweep said.

About 58 prosecution witnesses were examined by the NIA.

Naseer and Shafas were arrested by Meghalaya police at the state border while trying to cross over to Bangladesh in February 2010 and later handed over to NIA.

The two were found guilty of criminal conspiracy, creating disaffection toward government and religious enmity and charges under Unlawful Activities (Prevention) Act.

‘Planting of bombs and explosion constitute terrorist act. After the blast, people were evacuated and buses were removed’. The accused also wanted to promote enmity between different groups on grounds of caste or community, disharmony or feeling of enmity, the court held.

The bomb first exploded in a garbage dump at the Kerala State Road Transport Corporation bus station and soon after at a nearby drain.

After the judgement was delivered amid tight security, Naseer walked upto the NIA counsel and handed him a copy of the Quran, saying ‘thanks for handing me the sentence’.

Naseer is also an accused in the 2008 Bangalore serial blasts case, in which two persons were killed and 20 others injured.

Posted in Indian Muslims, Islamofascism, Kerala, State, Terrorism | Comments Off on Kozhikode Twins Blasts: Two Islamic Terrorists Found Guilty, Sentenced For Life

What is the future of the Kashmiri Pandits?

Posted by jagoindia on September 17, 2011


What is the future of the Kashmiri Pandits?

“When a man is robbed of his belongings, kicked out of his home, and forced to leave his land where his ancestors had lived for thousands of years, it is very hard to imagine that he will continue to have faith in the human values of his tormentors and destroyers –even of his neighbours and countrymen at large, and even that of the people around the world,” he said.

“Kashmiri Pandits, the original inhabitants of Kashmir, have been kicked and destroyed before, but never have they been so grossly brutalised, victimised, and dehumanised as this time. The annihilation of Pandits happened while the government of India was watching and well aware of the dimensions of the tragedy taking place but chose to play soft with its perpetrators, Muslims, in the hope of winning the civil war in Kashmir one day,” he said.

Today, he continued, “Most of the Pandits pass time in the dreary, pigeonholed, futureless existence in Jammu. Thousands of men in mid-30s to mid-50s never go to work, as they have chosen to survive on government handouts given in lieu of the salary they would have earned if they had the proper conditions to work in Kashmir. This psychological-self-annihilation is the worst price the Pandit community is paying at the hands of the civil war. It will take generations before Kashmiri Pandits of Jammu and Kashmir will regain purposefulness, confidence, and cheerfulness in their lives. Although Kashmir will continue to remain under India, its past social and cultural atmosphere will never reemerge. Kashmiri Pandits have to accept the fait accompli of the situation the events have thrown them into. They are the sideshow of the sideshow in this insane and ancient drama played between Muslims and Hindus. Kashmir cannot become their home in the same way as it was before.”

He added, “How can a Kashmiri Pandit return to a place where his fellow Kashmiri Pandits have been murdered, many of their houses have been burnt, by a majority community who hates them? Even though Kashmir will continue to remain a part of India, it is no longer a home of the Kashmiri Pandits. It would make a lot of sense for Kashmiri Pandit organisations like Panun Kashmir to withdraw from the cause of returning Pandits to Kashmir and re-channel their energies and financial resources to the placement of young Kashmiri Pandits in jobs, helping in the education of the destitute children, and the creation of international networking for the sustenance of the Pandit identity and ambition

Posted in Hindus, India, Islamofascism, Kashmir, Pakistan, State, Terrorism | Comments Off on What is the future of the Kashmiri Pandits?

NIA files chargesheet against 24 Kerala Islamic terrorists for training Kerala youth for terror

Posted by jagoindia on September 17, 2011


NIA files chargesheet against 24 for training Kerala youth for terror

TNN Feb 16, 2011

THIRUVANANTHAPURAM: The National Investigation Agency today filed chargesheet in the Kashmir terror recruitment case in which youth from Kerala were indoctrinated and recruited for jehadi traning by Lashkar-e-Taiba agents.

The chargesheet which was filed in a designated court in Kochi lists 24 accused. The main accused is K V Abdul Jaleel, who hails from Kannur. He is said to be an activist of the ultra-Islamic National Development Front which later merged to form the Popular Front of India. Some of the other accused named by the NIA are Pakistan national Wali Abdul Rahman and Sarfraz Nawaz, a keralite. Both of them were LeT operatives.

The chargesheet claimed that the conspiracy behind the terror recruitment extended beyond Indian borders and had links with some of the neighbouring countries. The youth were weaned away from their
homes in the guise of religious training and taken to places like Hyderabad where they were introduced to jehadi literature.

The terror trail came to light after the death of four Malayalee youth in an encounter with security forces in Kashmir in October 2008. They were identified as Mohd Fayaz of Kannur, Abdul Rahim of Malappuram, Rimon alias Mohd Yasin – a convert from Christianity – from Ernakulam and Fayeez of Kannur.

Investigation revealed that Bangalore blasts case accused Tadiyantavide Naseer who is also an accused in the case had taken the youth initially to Hyderabad where they were prepared ideologically and then sent across the border for weapons training. The first hits came from Mohd Jaleel, a painter, who had received phone calls from the militants while they were caught in the encounter. He led the cops to Faisal, the man who had taken Mohd Fayaz from his home in September 2008 on the pretext of a job in Bangalore.

Subsequently, it came to light that Faisal was one of the main recruiting agents for the LeT and is believed to have taken at least 100 men, mostly from Kannur, to Bangalore and Hyderabad for induction in terror. But the state government claimed that the figures were exaggerated.

Posted in Indian Muslims, Kashmir, Kerala, State | Comments Off on NIA files chargesheet against 24 Kerala Islamic terrorists for training Kerala youth for terror

Pakistan: A monster roaming the world

Posted by jagoindia on September 15, 2011


A monster roaming the world

Paul McGeough

The West has spent billions trying to buy Pakistan’s friendship but the jihadists are stronger than ever, writes Paul McGeough.

Search for a firm footing in Pakistan and there is none – all is quicksand … strategically, politically, morally.

Here in south Asia, strategically sandwiched between failing Afghanistan and the China and India powerhouses, is a country in which journalists are abducted in the night by agents of the state and murdered; in which the only advance after a decade in which Washington has tried to buy friendship with cheques for more than $20 billion, is the expansion of Pakistan’s nuclear arsenal – which is on the verge of surpassing Britain’s as the fifth biggest in the world.

In Pakistan, a 50-year-old woman is sentenced to death on a dubious blasphemy charge – and politicians who dare to speak in her defence are gunned down; and a woman is gang-raped and paraded naked through her village on the orders of a local council, over bogus claims that her 12-year-old brother has offended a 20-year-old woman from the clan of the men who defiled her.

But that’s village life. In the leafy garrison town of Abbottabad, an hour’s drive north of Islamabad, Osama bin Laden, mastermind of the attacks of September 11, 2001, was able to hide in plain sight for years. The location of his fortified bunker, a stone’s throw from a prestigious military academy, made it harder to give any credence to the generals’ repeated denials that significant elements of Pakistan’s extensive security apparatus sheltered the al-Qaeda chief and continue to give succour to the Taliban and other insurgency and terrorist movements.

In the south-west, in the wilds of provincial Baluchistan, there have been 150 ”kill and dump” operations this year. Most of the victims are Baluch nationalist rebels. Their killers are the Inter-Services Intelligence agency (ISI) and other elements of Pakistan’s national security forces – driven to brutality by a belief, which could be correct, that Pakistan’s arch foe, India, stirs the local nationalist pot. In turn, the Baluch nationalists are accused of running their own death squads – their victims are Punjabi ”settlers”, government workers brought in from other parts of the country.

Baluchistan is half Pashtun, which also makes it a sanctuary for the Taliban from adjoining Afghanistan, where Washington and the world still struggle, with little success, to impose a semblance of democracy on the bones of a fracturing, failing state. Here then is another of the ironies that puts a serious question mark over the bona fides of the Pakistani security forces: the leadership of the Afghanistan Taliban sequesters in Quetta, the provincial capital of Baluchistan, but the various Pakistani security services are so busy putting the Baluch nationalists through the mincer they don’t have time to take down the Taliban command-and-control centre. Instead, they reportedly socialise with the Taliban and sit in on their strategy meetings.

West from Baluchistan is the sprawling port city of Karachi, where the spiralling death toll in renewed ethnic turf-wars gives raw meaning to what local novelist Kamila Shamsie broaches obliquely, recounting how the city ”winks” at her. “Yes, the city said, I am a breeding ground for monsters, ” she writes, “but don’t think that is the full measure of what I am.”

This drab, chaotic home to 18 million people who account for 65 per cent of Pakistan’s economy is being carved up by bullets that this year have accounted for as many as 1000 ”wrong place, wrong time” deaths as gunmen randomly select their targets – sending messages to whole communities, not the individuals with whose blood they paint the rough pavements. As the suburbs seethe, police do little, because they are cowed by the systematic elimination of those in their ranks who intervened in the last iteration of these ethnic wars. Provincial and federal governments and the security forces only wring their hands.

In Karachi everyone lies. No one denies turf wars are being waged. They simply blame everyone else – all the political parties deny any links to the militias that prosecute their bloody agendas and to the crime, drug and land-development mafias that prosper in their wake. And the city’s once-dominant Urdu-speaking Mohajirs fight to maintain their control of corrupted city politics, amid an influx of Pashtuns fleeing upheavals along the Afghan border.

“Tension rises, we see killings and then scores must be settled,” an adviser to the provincial governor says. “We are at war – the political parties say they are not involved, but the mafias take shelter from the parties as they exploit the situation.”

In Islamabad, enter any of the city’s newsrooms, and see fear in the eyes of journalists who risk death and torture for going about assignments. Consider the words of their Karachi colleague Madiha Sattar – “a growth of intolerance has forged an extreme, murderous antipathy to freedom of expression.”

Most shocking in this campaign of fear and intimidation against one of the pillars of democracy was the disappearance in late May of Syed Saleem Shahzad, an investigative reporter for the respected, Hong Kong-based Asia Times Online. Two days after his abduction, Shahzad’s battered body was found at Mandi Bahauddin, 130 kilometres south-east of the capital. The reporter left detailed accounts of the threats he had received from the ISI; in Washington, senior officials unflinchingly confirming that Shahzad’s death had been ”sanctioned” by the Pakistani government.

Umar Cheema might just as easily have been their victim. Behind a door marked ”Investigation Cell” off a basement corridor in the Islamabad offices of The News, the 34-year-old father of two explains that the shock in his colleague Saleem Shahzad’s murder was a realisation it might just as easily have been him.

As Cheema drove home from a party in the early hours during Ramadan last year, 12 men who identified themselves as police commandos abducted him, he says. Informing him first that he was a suspect in a killing, they pulled a bag over his head and hauled him away.

“They took me to a building where the leader stripped off my clothes. Then I was ordered to lie on the floor and they beat me on the back and shoulders for 20 or 25 minutes with leather straps and wooden canes.

“I was writing about corruption in the government and the lack of accountability in the military and intelligence agencies – they said they were beating me because of my reporting. Then they shaved my head and eyebrows – that’s what is done to thieves in rural areas to humiliate them.

“Shahzad’s death left me speechless,” he says. “I was the second last victim before they took him. So I felt very much that this was a message for me – it was very, very personal.”

In Islamabad, the government of Prime Minister Yousaf Gillani is as overwhelmed as it is complicit in the nation’s failings. The economy is in crisis and the government has ceded control of more than half the country to the military or to extremist militias. “None of the cogs of state mesh to make it do what must be done,” Human Rights Commission of Pakistan’s Kamran Arif said.

Just south of Islamabad is Rawalpindi, a more typical Asian city than the sanitised and empty boulevards of Islamabad. As home and headquarters to the men and institutions that comprise Pakistan’s military and intelligence establishment, this is the centre of absolute power in Pakistan. And it is here that a deep-fried sense of humiliation over the American raid to kill Osama bin Laden, in May this year, is felt most acutely.

“After the bin Laden raid, it’s a question of the survival of the state,” the defence analyst and director of the South Asian Strategic Stability Institute, Maria Sultan, says. “The problem now is that by this very public humiliation, the US has lost its biggest supporter – it’s not the capability of the Pakistani military that is affected, it’s its credibility.”

A close reading of ”Getting Bin Laden”, The New Yorker’s inside account of the May 2 raid, reveals the mission was not just a single US incursion that managed to evade Pakistan’s air defences. On the night, there were effectively three separate American missions, none of which was detected by a military-security complex that demands indulgence by the people of Pakistan on the grounds that it is their only protection from the Indian hordes.

Pakistan’s generals faced a grim choice – they had to admit to deceiving the world in harbouring bin Laden, or to incompetence by not knowing he was lounging in their backyard. So supine were they in opting to plead incompetence there were fears of a mutiny in the middle ranks of the security services.

The US signal to the world of just how much it could not trust its south Asian ally came hard on the heels of serial embarrassments at the hands of the Taliban and other militant groups in Pakistan.

There have been a series of militant attacks on the most secure and sensitive defence establishments. The latest, which some observers concluded could not have been undertaken without inside help, saw a 10-man assault team storm the Mehran naval aviation base in Karachi. It took hundreds of Pakistani navy commandos, marines and paramilitaries to retake the base, but not before two aircraft were destroyed, hostages taken and the base had been occupied for the best part of a day.

But it takes a discerning Pakistani general to differentiate between militants – some are ”strategic assets” of the security apparatus and the generals refuse to go after them.

Dr Ayesha Agha, whose military and political commentaries appear in Pakistan’s Dawn newspaper, explains: “The military depends on these ‘assets’ – they are a cost-effective means to fighting wars that the Pakistani military wants to fight in India and Afghanistan.” Extrajudicial killings by the military now are counted in the hundreds.

When men in uniform were filmed recently murdering a detainee, the reckoning in human rights circles was that far from being a lapse of judgment, the recording had been allowed in the knowledge that its distribution on the internet would serve as a useful warning to the wider community.

A Karachi taxi driver becomes excited as he ferries us from the airport to a downtown hotel – “Pakistan lovely country,” he bellows. “Terrorism? No, no, no.”

But a single graphic in a 200-page study of Pakistan, published in May by the Washington-based Centre for Strategic and International Studies, reveals an impossible security challenge. Last year alone, 2113 terrorist attacks, 369 clashes between the security services and militants, 260 operational attacks by the security forces, 135 US drone attacks, 69 border clashes, 233 bouts of ethno-political violence and 214 inter-tribal clashes resulted in more than 10,000 dead and as many injured.

The death of bin Laden and the reported death of al-Qaeda’s new No. 2 figure, Atiyah Abd al-Rahman, in an American drone attack last week, are still being factored into a running debate among intelligence specialists on the extent to which al-Qaeda offshoots elsewhere in the world, especially the Yemen-based al-Qaeda in the Arabian Peninsula [AQAP], have taken the baton from the Pakistani organisation.

But a July study by the New America Foundation of 32 ”serious” jihadist terror plots against the West from 2004 to 2011, finds 53 per cent had operational or training links to jihadist groups in Pakistan – compared to just 6 per cent being linked to Yemen. And the rising tempo of the drone attacks has failed to dent the rising frequency of Pakistan-linked plots against the West, the study finds.

Implicit or explicit in any discussion on Pakistan’s volatile mix of militant violence and governmental chaos, is the level of anxiety around the world about the security of its nuclear arsenal. Confronted with claims such as that by bin Laden that acquiring a nuclear weapon was a ”religious duty” and the hope expressed by one of his lieutenants that such a weapon one day might be seized in Pakistan, officials in Islamabad invariably boast that all is tightly locked down.

But when we ask a Pakistani diplomat how secure were the weapons in the aftermath of the US mission to kill Osama bin Laden, he replies: “Less so, now that the Americans have revealed to the world that it is possible to sneak into Pakistan undetected, to take something that you really want.”

President Obama’s public appeal that Pakistan not become the world’s first ”nuclear-armed militant state” gives context to disclosures by The New Yorker’s Seymour Hersh of the existence of a US Special Operations rapid-response team which would be parachuted into Pakistan in the event of a nuclear crisis.

Rolf Mowatt-Larssen, a former director of intelligence and counter intelligence at the US Department of Energy, is boldest in setting out the fears of Washington, London and other capitals – some of which were disclosed without diplomatic varnish by Wikileaks last year.

Writing in Arms Control Today, Mowatt-Larssen, who served 20 years at the CIA, bills Pakistan as the most likely setting for terrorists bent on acquiring a nuclear device to co-opt a nuclear insider – of whom there are estimated to be as many as 70,000 in Pakistan.

“There is a lethal proximity between terrorists, extremists, and nuclear weapons insiders,” he writes. “Insiders have facilitated terrorist attacks. Suicide bombings have occurred at air force bases that reportedly serve as nuclear weapons storage sites. It is difficult to ignore such trends.

”Purely in actuarial terms, there is a strong possibility that bad apples in the nuclear establishment are willing to co-operate with outsiders for personal gain or out of sympathy for their cause.”

“Not possible,” says Maria Sultan. “About eight to 10,000 personnel working at the strategic level on security,” she says, ticking off seven or eight interlocking layers of complex security, the first of which she says would trip most intruders before they came within 80 kilometres of a nuclear facility. “The idea that a terrorist can walk in and get hold of a device is just not possible.”

Such is the bind in which Pakistanis find themselves. But if it is true feeble and corrupt civilian administrations make circumstances ripe for a military takeover, it is hardly surprising the generals have no respect for democratic fundamentals.

As revealed in one of the Wikileaks cables, Army chief General Ashfaq Parvez Kayani was ready to force President Asif Ali Zardari from office – save for the fact the general thought even less of Zardari’s likely civilian replacement. And historically, Washington has opted to connect with Pakistan through the military power of the generals, rather than the people power of the civilian leadership.

Bruce Riedel, a veteran CIA analyst, sets out the connections in Deadly Embrace: Pakistan, America and the Future of the Global Jihad. “…Richard Nixon turned a blind eye to the murder of hundreds of thousands of Bangladeshis to keep his friends in Pakistan’s army in power, a strategy that ultimately failed,” Riedel writes. “Ronald Reagan entertained Zia-ul-Haq even as Zia was giving succour to the Arab jihadists who would become al-Qaeda. George W. Bush allowed Pervez Musharraf to give the Afghan Taliban a sanctuary from which to kill American and NATO soldiers in Afghanistan.”

And in the judgment of Bushra Gohar, an elected MP from Pakistan’s troubled Swat Valley, Washington still prefers to deal with the military rather than the country’s civilian leadership. “That’s not a role that the military has under the constitution,” she says during a break in the business of the National Assembly in Islamabad. “There has been a democratic transition in this country and we expect the international community to support it.”

Power vacuums become ripe for exploitation, as was revealed with frightening clarity earlier this year when two of three elected figures who had dared to speak out against Pakistan’s draconian blasphemy laws were assassinated. In January, Punjab provincial governor Salman Taseer was gunned down by one of his state-provided security men; in March, the Minorities Minister and the only Christian in Gillani’s cabinet, Shahbaz Bhatti, died in a hail of gunfire as his car left his mother’s home in Islamabad.

Taseer’s killer confessed and became a national hero. His home is a shrine, he is garlanded with rose petals and, in the oddest twist of all, the young lawyers’ movement that effectively bundled Pervez Musharraf, the last dictator, from power in 2008, has taken the side of this cold-blooded murderer – not the principle for which his victim died.

A visitor leaves Pakistan wondering if anyone here speaks the truth. The dictators habitually resort to amping up religious parties – either to drown out secular ones that might be interested in the ideals of selfless democracy, or to further marginalise the country’s Shiia Muslim minority.

“And people like Musharraf have two faces,” Kamran Arif of the Human Rights Commission of Pakistan said. “He would say all the right things for the West and do just what he wanted to do at home.”

Some foreign analysts fall back on the seeming failure of Pakistan’s religious parties at the ballot box as a hopeful sign. But a sense of rising radicalisation, particularly in the military and the middle classes, suggests an asymmetric contest for control of a highly unstable society – the non-religious parties fight in the parliament, but the religious parties are street brawlers.

Sherry Rehman, the only elected figure in the country to defend the convicted blasphemer Aasia Bibi, makes the same point in explaining how that debate was lost. “The discourse shifted from the parliament to the street,” she says.

“We have to keep the agenda in the parliament, and not with the gun-toting thugs who make inflammatory speeches outside.”

Like the financial institutions in the 2008 global financial crisis, Pakistan is deemed by Washington to be ”too big to fail”. Between them, however, Washington and Islamabad have been unable in the past decade to make this relationship work – credibly or creditably.

Predictions of imminent collapse in Islamabad are exaggerated, but perhaps not overly so. “The government does not have the capacity to tackle any of the issues,” says the Human Rights Commission of Pakistan’s Arif. “Things will just keep getting bad … and I don’t discount the fact that we can fall into chaos.”

Like many other analysts, Bruce Riedel laboriously sets out the policy options by which Washington and Islamabad might work together to defeat the global jihadist movement – before he concludes that none is easy or guaranteed.

An adviser to several US administrations and now with the Brookings Institution, Riedel sees Pakistan under siege from a syndicate of radical terrorist groups unified by the notion that nuclear-armed Pakistan could be the extremist jihadist state they have never had.

“They want to hijack Pakistan and its weapons,” he says. Alluding to Islamabad’s role in creating a monster, as often as not with Washington’s sponsorship, he writes: “An extremely powerful jihadist Frankenstein is now roaming the world, with equally powerful protectors in Pakistani society, right up to the very top.

“Who cannot fear that the ‘long beards’ will prevail?”

Posted in Islamofascism, Jihad, Pakistan, Terrorism, West | Comments Off on Pakistan: A monster roaming the world

Indian Islamic Terrorists Could be Behind Delhi Blasts: Chidambaram

Posted by jagoindia on September 14, 2011


Home grown militants could be behind Delhi blast: PC
Press Trust Of India
London, September 13, 2011

Home minister P Chidambaram has indicated that the blast in the Delhi High Court could have been carried out by home grown militants groups. “We can no longer point to cross-border terrorism as a source of terror attacks in India,” Chidambaram told the BBC in an interview. He said the authorities were still trying to verify emails allegedly sent by two groups claiming responsibility for Wednesday’s attack.

The two groups who have purportedly said they carried out the attack are Harkat-ul Jihad al-Islami (HuJI), which has Pakistani origins and is accused of links to al Qaeda, and the Indian Mujahideen.

The home minister said even though HuJI had claimed responsibility for the blast, the group had not been active in India for a while.

“There have been three major attacks in India recently -in Pune, Mumbai (Bombay) and Delhi. In respect of the Mumbai and Pune attacks, we are fairly certain they were carried out by Indian modules or India-based modules,” he said.

In the past, India has often blamed Pakistan-based groups for carrying out attacks on its soil.

“That threat remains – but we must also look at Indian modules or India-based modules which are capable of carrying out terror attacks,” he said.

Chidambaram said the country’s proximity to Pakistan and Afghanistan was a cause for worry and India was concerned about how to prevent the “radicalisation” of its youth.

“The government can build capacity and extend the intelligence network, but policing is a very complex task and there will be cases where the terrorist is able to slip through the cracks,” he said.

Posted in Delhi, India, Indian Muslims, Islamofascism, Pakistan, State, Terrorism | Comments Off on Indian Islamic Terrorists Could be Behind Delhi Blasts: Chidambaram

Muslims riots during Ganesh festival in Madhya Pradesh

Posted by jagoindia on September 13, 2011


Ujjain, Madhya Pradesh (CHAKRA)

There were Hindu – Muslim riots on the issue of installation of Ganesh idol at Ujjain. Two persons were killed and many got injured during these riots. Curfew has been imposed in the jurisdiction of 9 police stations in the city.

The trouble began on Friday night in the Daulatgunj old town area of Ujjain after a Hindu shop-owner installed an idol of Ganesh at his store, which is
adjacent to a mosque. Police said that some members of the Muslim community objected to it since the idol is un-Islamic and was near the Mosque where
Muslims were praying. Although the idol was on the shopkeepers property,police urged the shopkeeper to shift the idol to another spot to calm the Muslim mob.

Via link

Posted in Festival, Indian Muslims, Islamofascism, Madhya Pradesh, Mob, Riots/clash, State, Ujjain | Comments Off on Muslims riots during Ganesh festival in Madhya Pradesh

Politics in Kashmir a Money Game,as “filthy” as Dal lake: US cable

Posted by jagoindia on September 13, 2011


Politics in Kashmir as “filthy” as Dal lake: US cable
PTI Sep 05,2011

Srinagar, Sept 5 (PTI) Politics in Kashmir is “as filthy as Dal lake” and corruption cuts across party lines, according to leaked US diplomatic cables from India released by Wikileaks. David Mulford in a cable to Washington in 2006 when he was the US ambassador to India also alleged that corruption in Jammu and Kashmir was widespread and prevalent not only among mainstream politicians but separatists as well. “Corruption cuts across party lines and most Kashmiris take it as an article of faith that politically-connected Kashmiris take money from both India and Pakistan,” Mulford said in the cable which was released by Wikileaks last week. The April 2006 cable, released by Wikileaks and titled “Kashmiri politics as filthy as Dal lake”, alleges that politicians — mainstream as well as separatists — amassed wealth within the country and abroad. Mulford observed that the spread of corruption undermined popular support of existing political parties and s eparatists. “Money from Pakistani and Indian intelligence agencies and from Saudi and other foreign extremists has further distorted Kashmiri politics, incentivized leaders to perpetuate the conflict, and perverted state and central government institutions,” he added. In another US diplomatic cable, Mulford quoted JKLF chairman Yasin Malik as alleging that Kashmir is all a “money game”. “Kashmiri politics is no longer about ideology, it’s all a money game,” the US diplomatic cable dated April 2006 quotes Malik as saying. The cable further alleged that a “recurring theme” throughout the interactions with Kashmiris suggest how Indian and Pakistani money has made all Kashmiri political actors dependent on “handouts”. The cable said that state administration gets “rivers of money” for development but the streets in J and K are “appalling, even by Indian standards.” It however, believed that the funds to Kashmiri politicians from India and Pakistan will stop flowing once the Kashmir issue is resolved.

Kashmir is a money game: David Mulford

ET Bureau Sep 5, 2011

SRINAGAR: David Mulford, who was American Ambassador to India, cabled the US State Department in February 2006, “Kashmir politics is as filthy as Dal Lake”.

Scores of cables of whistleblower website WikiLeaks has several instances explaining the vested interest of ‘stakeholders’ in keeping the Kashmir pot boiling. “Corruption cuts across party lines and most Kashmiris take it as an article of faith that politically-connected Kashmiris take money from both India and Pakistan,” a cable noted.

Giving an example, Mulford’s cable alleged that a Kashmiri businessman told embassy officials that Mirwaiz Umer Farooq had acquired property in Dubai and the Kashmir Valley from payoffs done by intelligence agencies of India and Pakistan.

The cable noted that some “security officers bribe their way into Kashmir assignments that give access to lucrative civil affairs and logistics contracts.” Mulford’s cable also referred to a newspaper report suggesting a “retired minister for Irrigation and Flood Control” embezzled funds to construct two large homes in Srinagar.

Money from Pakistani and Indian intelligence agencies and foreign extremists has distorted Kashmiri politics and incentivised leaders to perpetuate the conflict, another Mulford cable alleged.

“While this river of dirty money has led to a boom in Kashmiri household income and real estate prices, it also calls into question whether the Kashmiri elite truly want a settlement to their problems. The minute a deal is struck, some must surely worry that the funds will dry up,” the cable said.

An April 2006, a cable from Mulford alleged that when JKLF’s Yasin Malik asked people belonging to moderate separatist Bilal Lone’s area to refuse government compensation (paid for every innocent killing), the latter told US officials that “Yasin should give up ‘a month of his Pakistani salary’ to compensate families of boys killed”.

The cable was based on the US officials’ visit to Srinagar between April 3 and 5. In the same cable Mulford quotes PDP leader Mehbooba Mufti accusing New Delhi of reverting “to its customary bad old ways” before the April 24, 2006, by-elections.

The Intelligence Bureau, the cable quotes Ms Mufti alleging, had given Sajjad (Gani Lone) a crore of rupees to support an independent candidate secretly affiliated to him. Arecurring theme, Mulford informs his bosses in Washington, “throughout all of our interactions with Kashmiris” is “how Indian and Pakistani money has made all Kashmiri political actors dependent on handouts.”

He alleged: “Omar and Farooq Abdullah, descendants of the Sheikh who first figured out Delhi’s money game, live in fabulous houses in Srinagar and Delhi, wear matching Panerai watches, serve Blue Label to guests and travel all over the world first class courtesy the Indian government.”

The ambassador, who served in India for little over five years, was pained to see the lack of development work. “The state administration gets rivers of money for development but the streets in J&K are appalling, even by Indian standards.”

The cable quoted two leaders who admitting that there was money. “Sajjad lamented that the conflict remained lucrative to many, and he is right,” the cable reads.

“CPM legislator Yusuf Tarighami also told us too many people have a stake in the conflict’s perpetuation.” Even Yasin Malik said: “Kashmiri politics is no longer about ideology, it’s all a money game.”

Posted in Islamofascism, Kashmir, Terrorism | Comments Off on Politics in Kashmir a Money Game,as “filthy” as Dal lake: US cable

Delhi Court Bombing: Islamic Terrorists Dress Rehearsal on May

Posted by jagoindia on September 7, 2011


After May 25, the police had said the incident could be a rehearsal for a much bigger and lethal attack, and submitted a proposal before the registrar of the high court for installing CCTV cameras at all the nine entry and exit gates and in the parking lots. Via link

Low-intensity explosion outside Delhi HC; none injured

May 25, 2011

NEW DELHI: A minor explosion outside Delhi high court on Wednesday shattered the lull in the capital for over eight months when a low intensity explosive went off without causing any damage.

The explosion prompted Delhi Police to sound an alert in the city and strengthen security by deploying more personnel on streets and crowded places like markets and to intensify checking of vehicles.

The explosive kept in a white polythene bag near a lawyer’s car parked at Gate No 7 on Service Road went off at around 1.25 pm causing panic and three minutes later, police received the call regarding the blast.

Police was groping for clues in the blast and were hesitant to hazard a guess about who was behind it.

“It was not an accident. There was a minor explosion. A packet containing explosives kept in a plastic bag near the car’s right side exploded. There were minor damages to the car. There was no casualty or injuries,” Dharmendra Kumar, Special Commissioner (Law and Order), told reporters.

Today’s blast was the second in the last eight months, the previous one being a blast in car on September 19 last year near Jama Masjid for which terror outfit Indian Mujahideen took responsibility. That blast took place after two unidentified men opened fire at a Taiwanese media crew ahead of the Commonwealth Games.

Noting that the nature of the explosives is yet to be ascertained, he said the car owner has nothing to do with the incident. He said lawyer Rajat Jain had parked his car and had gone to the canteen to have food.

“There was a sudden blast in the parking lot. We rushed to the spot and found a black bag burning beside the car,” said parking attendant Dharamvir.

Justice Sanjay Kishan Kaul and Justice GS Sistani as also Delhi Police chief BK Gupta visited the spot.

Lawyers having refreshment in a canteen inside the court complex and near the parking lot rushed outside after they heard a loud explosion.

“I was in canteen having a soft drink. At around 1:25 pm I heard a loud explosion outside gate no 7. I rushed outside and saw a burning plastic bag near a car. It was just below the bonnet,” a lawyer Safroz said.

Posted in Delhi, State, Terrorism | Comments Off on Delhi Court Bombing: Islamic Terrorists Dress Rehearsal on May